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With so many new reports, many drivers are still reluctant to switch to electric cars.

The study was published at the COP26 Climate Summit in Glasgow, and is being described as a key factor in helping countries transition to EVs achieve zero zero targets.

However, despite the reservations, the UK Automotive Trade Unit has said that the increase in demand for EV will be the first victim of an internal combustion chamber before the sale of new gasoline and fuel fuels by 2030. .

New reports from the beginning of the second week of the COP26 Climate Conference show that there are many reasons why many drivers are still not convinced that electric cars are the way to go.

Drivers do not trust MPs to provide infrastructure.

According to a new study by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), many drivers are reluctant to switch to electric vehicles altogether because they do not trust the government’s ability to provide the necessary infrastructure.

Local officials expressed concern that “there is a lack of consistent national strategic direction, a lack of vision for the future, and a lack of transparency in the role of officials in the delivery of EV payment infrastructure.”

A survey of 3,404 UK license holders found that nearly two-thirds (63 per cent) of politicians are unsure whether the government will be able to make a smooth transition of electric vehicles by the end of its term. Decades.

The report comes a day after a British company announced plans to set up 190,000 public billing points across the country by 2030, most of which will be backed by government subsidies.

The RSC survey said there was enough public reluctance to switch to electric motors, which could hamper lawmakers’ efforts to reduce air pollution, with more than a third (34 percent) saying they did not plan to buy a fully electric car. Over the next decade.

The main thing, however, is that half (46 percent) do not feel that they have enough information to make an informed decision about whether their next car or van will be fully electric.

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) says one of the biggest obstacles for drivers is a lack of trust in their promise to provide a suitable charging infrastructure.

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) says one of the biggest obstacles for drivers is a lack of trust in their promise to provide a suitable charging infrastructure.

RSC President Tom Walton said: “After hearing that the government is slowing down its electric vehicle infrastructure, this study shows that a lot of work is being done to convince the public of the need for a complete overhaul. Electric Vehicles – But more robust, efforts to provide critical infrastructure for both rechargeable and reusable EV batteries must be a government priority.

“In order to transition to a full-fledged electric vehicle network, we need to improve the flow of information around government plans.

More than a third (40 percent) of respondents surveyed by RCC expressed concern that EVs could have a negative impact on the environment. Batteries.

Another 55 percent are concerned about the lack of natural resources for the production of EV batteries.

One-third of respondents said they would not be able to buy EVs unless they had fewer ‘extra rare and expensive ingredients’.

Despite the recent EVs covering more than 300 miles on a single charge, regional concerns remain a concern.

Almost all UK drivers overestimate the number of damage caused by EV charging infrastructure and traffic problems, according to a new AA report.

A.D. In 2020, his bodyguards reported nearly 13,000 electric vehicle crashes, less than 4 percent of which were paid vehicles. That figure has halved over the past few years.

However, only 1 percent of the 14,500 drivers can accurately estimate the frequency of this issue, with an average of two-thirds (65 percent) of all EV crashes due to a major battery failure.

The fact is that the two main faults for burning motor vehicles and EVs are the same, the tires and the small 12-volt battery are the main causes of the error.

While many electric cars can cover more than 300 miles per charge, drivers are still concerned about the region, and 99% of drivers are mistaken for how often EVs can be damaged due to battery drain.

While many electric cars can cover more than 300 miles per charge, drivers are still concerned about the region, and 99% of drivers are mistaken for how often EVs can be damaged due to battery drain.

Drivers were asked what they believe is the average distance EV can travel in a single charge, with only a quarter (25 percent) accurately identifying distances up to 200 miles.

Some 6% believed that the latest models were offering less than 100 miles per charge.

As AA President Edmund King participates in the Scottish EV Rally or ‘EVROS’, a five-day event for electric vehicles and covers some of Scotland’s most rugged and mountainous areas such as John O ‘Groats and Ben Navis.

The event will cover more than 1,200 miles for EV drivers, covering more than 150 miles a day and 315 miles a day.

King, who drives or aides all the way, said: “It is very important that the EV rally is connected to COP26, where climate change talks are held.

‘EVs must show that they can travel long distances even in the coldest of Scotland and can be reimbursed for those trips.

‘Personally, I can’t wait to go behind the EV tire to explore a specific area in Scotland and show how EVs work.’

AA President Edmund King poses with Electric Polstar 2 ahead of this week's Scottish EV Rally

AA President Edmund King poses with Electric Polstar 2 ahead of this week’s Scottish EV Rally

Drivers believe that today’s EVs will be obsolete within 3 years

EV technology is growing so fast that most (62 percent) drivers think the latest cars may be obsolete within three years, according to AA Smart Lease Arm.

That is despite the fact that many models on the market have software over-the-air capabilities to improve range, reduce charging time and add new features.

One in ten drivers who set the best three-year date on electric models believes that zero-emission vehicles coming off the line today will be obsolete within a year.

The study shows the differences between generations. Young drivers (18 to 24 years old) are more confident in the longevity of EV technology, and 8 percent said it expects it to last more than five years.

Older drivers (65+ years old) were only half as likely to say that, and only 4 percent believe that the current ETV Tech will still exist within five years.

“Some drivers want to stop investing in technology by buying cars,” said James Ferkloff, CEO of AA Smart Lease.

Our study clearly shows the level of trust among drivers with the new longevity of EV technology. Renting to people who are not confident in purchasing the technology is a good way to enjoy the EV service without having to risk contacting them quickly. ‘

COP26: Shows why drivers don't want to switch to electric cars

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