Mamie-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said in a press release that the installation of new charging stations for electric vehicles in the West Lot garage of the county is part of a low-carbon transportation transition.  Mami, Florida, Thursday, September 30, 2021 to fight climate change.

Mamie-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava said in a press release that the installation of new charging stations for electric vehicles in the West Lot garage of the county is part of a low-carbon transportation transition. Mami, Florida, Thursday, September 30, 2021 to fight climate change.

Special to the Miami Herald

The electric vehicle market is booming in Florida, and Miami-Dade County is entering the fray.

On Thursday morning, the county unveiled a new electric car charging station in one of the county-owned garages, along with OBN Energy, which operates the state’s second-largest charging station after Tesla.

Miami-Dade Mayor Danlala Levine Cava told the crowd across the street from the government center in Miami: “It’s exciting to see where our electric car market can finally compete.”

The district also announced that it has recently purchased another 42 electric buses, bringing the total to 75.

“I believe we will be the largest electric bus fleet in the country,” she said.

Sales of electric vehicles exploded in Florida, and Miami-Dade residents own more than any other district. State records show that as of December 2020, there were 3,907 “slow” charging stations and 844 “fast” charging stations in the region, with large numbers coming.

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Many free apps show electric car drivers where they can charge their vehicles. Miami has dozens of charging stations, many along the way. PlugShare app

Drivers who park in a government-owned parking garage pay 30 cents per koa to charge two-stage or “slow” chargers, said Alejandro Burgana, general manager of OBE Power. The average payment lasts about three hours and costs about $ 7. OBE pays for the electricity district, and Miami-Dade also makes a small profit.

Mami City is also working with Florida Power and Lighting to install additional charging stations in a few city parks and buildings.

“One common theme for the next two or three years is that there will be more EV stations than gas stations,” Burganan told the Miami Herald. It is becoming accessible.

When it comes to adapting to climate change, there are few technologies that are as popular and popular as electric cars. Many major car companies have promised to stop selling gasoline cars altogether in the next decade, and have reduced battery costs with federal and state subsidies, making EVs a more affordable option for many.

They are an important step towards electrification in Mami-Dade, where transportation accounts for 55% of emissions by 2019. About 40% of all cars are made of gasoline.

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About 55% of Mami-Dade County’s total emissions come from transportation and 40% from petrol-powered cars. Miami-Dade County

Mamie-Dade’s draft climate action strategy calls for the conversion of county-based vehicles to electric cars by 2030, and the addition of additional charging stations will help persuade new drivers to change, he said.

That means converting Mami-Dade’s own ships into electric cars – a long-term command for such a large district.

Of the county’s 11,000 cars, buses and trucks, there are fewer than a dozen. The county’s new electric bus order will bring the total number of gasoline and natural gas buses to about 75. Since the district’s first order, only one electric bus has arrived.

The new Mami-Dade policy, which will take effect on Friday, will require 10% of car purchases this year. Another 10% will be affected by that number every year, so 20% of electric vehicles by 2022, 30% by 2023, and so on.

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In Mami, Florida, Thursday, September 30, 2021, Sam Navarro is part of a transition to low-carbon transportation to combat climate change. Special to the Miami Herald

Sean McKrakin, the mayor’s policy director, estimates that the county will purchase at least 80 electric vehicles by the end of the year.

Of course, electric cars alone are not the answer. About half of the Mami-Dade families do not have or have limited car access. 10% do not have a car.

That’s where public transportation comes in. Experts say the best way to reduce emissions and traffic and air pollution is to get more people out of cars and into buses and trains.

Mamie-Dade’s climate strategy aims to transform 10% of the population by 2030, who often turn cars into public transportation on their own.

With the Miami Riders Association, Kevin Amezaga, Miami-Dade said he has a number of big plans to improve public transportation, such as the SMART Plan and a better bus project, but county leaders are not working.

“Getting people on a faster, safer transit starts with building that fast and secure transportation and giving you the option to use it. The county’s priorities do not match that message. ” The constant focus on electric buses is really good – in a world where we have to deal with the issue of getting people on buses first. Getting people out of the car is the best thing we can do.

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Alex Harris covers climate change in the Miami Herald, including how South Florida communities adapt to global warming. She studied at the University of Florida.

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